Anatomy-Physiotherapy-logo

      flag spain flag portugal

Art & Design

Written by Mies van den Biggelaar

Simon Stephen
Image by: Simon Stephen

Anatomy sculptures from dust, by Paul Hazelton

Armed with household dust, British artist Paul Hazelton, creates his sculptures. Often focussed around ontology, myth, decay and creation. His complex artworks are built with dust, hair, cobwebs, cut paper, stuffed toy and other materials.

You are probably wondering why somebody would be working with dust, something that is socially often associated with poor housekeeping, neglect and carelessness. Paul Hazelton explains why he works with dust, “Dust is a product of living, yet people want to clear all evidence of it away. It is an interesting material to use to explore broad and sometimes difficult subjects (such as mortality) as everyone has a relationship with dust, in some way or another.”

If you know what material Paul Hazelton’s works are made of you might feel a little itchy, but at the same time his creations are soft and airy sculptures, impressive and delicate.

Want to discover more of Paul Hazelton’s work (both made with and without dust)? Visit his website.

Paul Hazelton
Image by: Paul Hazelton

Tags: Sculptures, Anatomy & Art, Dust , Depart

  • /art-design/1984-medical-and-anatomical-graphics-by-bryan-christie-design
  • /art-design/1971-elephant-wounded-by-land-mine-gets-prosthetic-leg