fbpx

Visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain

Visual feedback alters onset of movement-evoked pain

Pain is influenced by the world around us, as we integrate contextual, psychological and sensory inputs that may suggest danger to the body. The aim of this study was to investigate whether non-nociceptive sensory information may contribute to pain in people with neck pain.

When vision overstated the amount of rotation, self reported pain occurred at 7% less rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback, and when vision understated rotation, pain occurred at 6% greater rotation than under conditions of accurate visual feedback.

The results suggest that visual-proprioceptive feedback has the ability to modulate pain thresholds in people with neck pain. This raises the possibility of novel experimental and therapeutic applications.

> From: Harvie et al., Psychol Sci (2015-03-26 06:29:55) (Epub ahead of print). All rights reserved to The Author(s). Click here for the online summary.

Signup for our weekly or monthly newsletter and get notified on updates on the themes you're interested in:

Please enable the javascript to submit this form

Anatomy & Physiotherapy is a joint venture
between SoPhy & Sharing Science

Summaries on Physiotherapy B.V.
Berkenweg 7
Postbus 1161
3800 BD Amersfoort
The Netherlands

Chamber of commerce: 74973738
Bank: NL72ABNA0849809959
V.A.T. number: NL860093530B01
____________

Sharing Science
Rijksweg Zuid 99
6134 AA Sittard
The Netherlands
Chamber of Commerce: 58306862